Archive for the 'Sunday’s Child' Category

And the child that is born on the Sabbath Day is bonny and blithe and good and gay. That is why Sundays are devoted to child-related posts!

Melissa

Sunday’s Child: Knit-O-Graf

Knit-O-Graf ad from 1959 McCalls Needlework & Crafts

Knit-O-Graf ad from 1959 McCalls Needlework & Crafts

Knit-to-Fit Snow White Graph

Knit-to-Fit Snow White Graph

Some day, a part of my needlework museum library will include a copy of every Knit-O-Graf and Knit-to-Fit chart published. I’m only up to 2 of each so far.

In the 1950s, knits featuring colorful pictures were all the rage, especially for children. Typical themes included cowboys, poodles, rocket ships, ice-skaters, adorable animals, clowns, and fairy tales. If you could find it on a dish towel, it was probably also on a sweater at some point. This trend really didn’t peter off until, well, ever. These days, you might find some more sophisticated designs for children; grown-up sweaters made small, but you’ll still find sweaters featuring kittens, ladybugs and choo choo trains. On the flip side, we’ve also incorporated more childlike designs into adult wear, giving grownups an in on the whimsical and cheerful that would have seemed too, too gauche not very long ago. This is lucky for everyone involved.

Big names in graphed knitting included the Knit-O-Graf and Knit-to-Fit charted patterns. When I found my first of these, I was ecstatic. Although they were designed for children, and the patterns sized appropriately, the clear charts are quirky and fun, and could be used to easily give a retro vibe to any sweater, whether for child or for adult. I own Knit-O-Graf patterns No. 170 and No. 206, featuring cowboys and poodles, and Knit-to-Fit patterns No. 410 and No. 416, featuring an ice skater and Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. The Snow White design includes a copyright notice for Walt Disney Productions, but it’s hard to tell whether this was an officially licensed design. That whole idea of character copyright and licensing was notoriously weird during the early half of the 20th century.

Knit-to-Fit Ice Skater

Knit-to-Fit Ice Skater

From a technical standpoint, the charts are very interesting. Written instructions are included, but with a basic understanding of increasing and decreasing, sweater construction, and how intarsia works, the graph itself is all you really need. Each of the charts includes instructions for both pullover and cardigan styles, as well as different sleeve lengths and neck options.

Included below is the chart for the figure skater from Knit-to-Fit pattern No. 410. Use it to spiff up an existing garment by working the chart in duplicate stitch, or practice your intarsia chops by adding her into a new garment. She’d be adorable on a sweater, scarf, hat, or possibly even mittens or socks, or on knitted dishclothes and towels. Recharted in a clean digital file, in color for ease of reading, at roughly 5:7 ratio. Choose your own colors, of course.

iceskater

Notes on copyrights: The Knit-O-Graf charts were designed and copyrighted by Della Delia Fitch and renewed in the 1980s by Nancy Karen Fitch Mott. They are still protected by copyright! They were distributed in Canada by Bouquet Yarns, and in the US by mail direct from the Knit-O-Graf Pattern Company. Knit-to-Fit charts were published during the same time period by Bernhard Ulmann Co, makers of Bear Brand, Fleisher’s, and Bucilla yarns. I cannot find any renewal information on the Knit-to-Fit charts. To the best of my knowledge the patterns are not still protected by copyright, however, designs featuring copyrighted characters may be otherwise protected. I always urge caution when approaching reproduction of such items. If I should be informed, or find information, that the chart I have provided is infringing in any way, it will be removed from the website as soon as possible.

Melissa

Sunday’s Child: Babykins

A Jacket and Bonnet for Babykins is the next little vintage pattern PDF available from Lothruin.com. I love this little jacket, it’s so pretty. I think I’d like to make one that fit me! I wonder if I could get a me-sized gauge by just changing to a yarn instead of a thread. Hmmm. How heavy would I have to go to make it me-sized, and would it be ucky then? Anyway, if you’d prefer not to do the math, you can still make it for a baby. :D

babykins
http://www.lothruin.com/pdfs/babykins.pdf

Melissa

Sunday’s Child: Ahoy matey!

Sunday’s Child focuses on happy children. The easy way out for a Sunday article is therefore a toy pattern. I’ve gone a step further and taken the exceptionally lazy way out by providing you with a scan of the pattern, but not even trying to enlarge it to useful proportions. The graphic is set at about 1 square = 1/2″ and should just fit on an 8.5″ x 11″ sheet. It will then need to be enlarged by 400% for the sit-able size. However, the toy itself is sweet and whimsical, and is both stuffed animal and nursery furniture, and one can adjust the size to anything desired, from tiny to towering. My own child is outside the appropriate age group for this toy, or I’d make it myself. Added note: I love that it has a tattooed fin. So, without further ado, I present the Sit-on Whale from the Woman’s Day gift issue, November 1963.

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